Speakers & Sessions

Jamie Orlikoff

President, Orlikoff & Associates, Inc.

Jamie Orlikoff

Jamie Orlikoff is president of Orlikoff & Associates, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in healthcare governance and leadership, strategy, quality, patient safety, and organizational development. He is the National Advisor on Governance and Leadership to the American Hospital Association and Health Forum, and was named one of the 100 most powerful people in healthcare in the inaugural list by Modern Healthcare magazine.

Mr. Orlikoff has been involved in leadership, quality, and strategy issues for over 40 years. He has consulted with hospitals and systems in 12 countries, and since 1985 has worked with hospital and system governing boards to strengthen their overall effectiveness and their oversight of strategy and quality, as well as working on improving the relationships between boards, medical staffs, and management. The author of 15 books and over 100 articles, he has served on hospital, college and civic boards and is currently a member of the St. Charles Health System board in Bend, Oregon. Mr. Orlikoff holds an MA in social and organizational psychology from the University of Chicago and a BA from Pitzer College in Claremont, California.

Mr. Orlikoff will be presenting...

Brave New World: Trends in Healthcare and Their Implications for Liability

clock  8:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. | Opening Keynote

The U.S. healthcare system is facing a wide array of challenges, from rapidly escalating healthcare costs to the aging American population and the attendant pressures on Medicare financing. These disruptive forces have given rise to trends that are familiar to every clinician: hospital system consolidation, the consumerization of healthcare, and the ever-increasing pressure on medical professionals to accomplish more in less time – while remaining resilient and avoiding burnout.

In this session, healthcare futurist Jamie Orlikoff will explore the market forces behind these disruptions and discuss strategies physicians can use to prioritize patient safety and reduce liability risk in today’s healthcare landscape.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the market forces that are driving disruption in healthcare and physician practices
  • Describe emerging areas of liability exposure that may result from these disruptive forces
  • Identify strategies for responding to the market changes while minimizing future liability risk

Lipi Roy, MD, MPH, DABAM

Clinical Assistant Professor, NYU Langone Health

Lipi Roy, MD, MPH, DABAM

Lipi Roy, MD, MPH, DABAM, is a sought-after, charismatic speaker whose mission is to educate and empower the public to make healthy decisions through nutrition, mindfulness and addiction awareness. She is a Forbes contributor and has appeared on CNN, Dr. Oz, Charlie Rose and CBS New York. She has also published in the Huffington Post and STAT and has been featured in The New York Times, Boston Globe, Wall Street Journal, Cooking Light and Oprah.com.

Dr. Roy is an internal medicine physician, board-certified in addiction medicine, as well as a clinical assistant professor at NYU Langone Health. As the former chief of addiction medicine for New York City jails, including Rikers Island, Dr. Roy oversaw substance use treatment and recovery services for the nation’s second-largest jail. Previously, she was a primary care doctor to Boston’s vulnerable homeless population, among whom the leading cause of death was drug overdose. She currently treats patients at a Brooklyn-based addiction treatment center.

Dr. Roy also served as an attending physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. She completed her medical and master’s in public health degrees at Tulane University, followed by internal medicine training at Duke University Medical Center.

Dr. Roy is a strong advocate for public service. In addition to caring for incarcerated and homeless men and women, she has served the underserved in Nicaragua and India, as well as New Orleans residents affected by Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Roy has provided medical relief to earthquake victims in Haiti and volunteered in the medical tent at the Boston Marathon. She currently volunteers with the New York City Medical Reserve Corps.

Dr. Roy shares her expertise about health and wellness on her websites, www.LipiRoyMD.com, Spices for Life MD and her YouTube channel. She can be followed on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Dr. Roy will be presenting...

The Opioid Crisis: Evidence-Based Strategies to Address This Public Health Epidemic

clock  10:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. | Breakout Session

In 2015, over 27 million people in the United States used illicit drugs or misused prescription drugs, costing over $400 billion annually in crime, health and lost productivity. In 2017, over 70,000 people died of a drug overdose, two-thirds of which were related to opioids. Even though the treatment strategy for opioid use disorder is well-established, only 20% access treatment. Stigma and lack of education remain major barriers to care. This session will describe the scope of the opioid crisis and evidence-based treatment, as well as other comprehensive strategies and harm reduction tools.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize addiction as a chronic medical disease, a relapsing and remitting disease of the brain
  • Identify evidence-based treatment strategies for opioid use disorder, including medications and behavioral therapies
  • Describe the role of stigma as a barrier to care for individuals with addiction
  • Recognize the important role of harm reduction tools in caring for individuals with addiction

Dean F. Sittig, PhD

Professor in the School of Biomedical Informatics, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston

Dean F. Sittig, PhD

Dean F. Sittig, PhD, is a professor of biomedical informatics in the School of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. He received his PhD in medical informatics from the University of Utah. His research interests center on the design, development, implementation and evaluation of all aspects of clinical information and communication systems.

Dr. Sittig has spent his career working to improve our understanding of both the factors that lead to success as well as the unintended consequences associated with various forms of health information technology. He has also spent considerable time studying various aspects of computer-based provider order entry.

Most recently he has focused his efforts on developing guidelines for the safe and effective implementation and use of electronic health records (EHRs), based on an eight-dimension sociotechnical model that he developed with Hardeep Singh, MD. This work led to the development of the SAFER guides, which were designed to help healthcare organizations conduct proactive risk assessments of their EHRs.

He occasionally serves as an expert witness in legal matters that involve analysis of EHR audit log data. He recently coauthored the books Improving OutcomesA Practical Guide to Clinical Decision Support Implementation; Clinical Information Systems: Overcoming Adverse Consequences; Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation; and most recently, SAFER Electronic Health Records: Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience.

For a listing of most of Dr. Sittig’s peer-reviewed scientific articles, see: http://tinyurl.com/SittigDF-Publications.

Dr. Sittig will be presenting...

Understanding EHRs: From Patient Safety to Defensibility of Care

clock  10:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. | Breakout Session

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) represent one of the most important changes the healthcare delivery system has experienced in the last 20 years. EHRs have led to significant improvements in patient safety but have also resulted in numerous unintended adverse consequences.

This session will focus on the sociotechnical interactions between healthcare providers, the health information technology infrastructure (including the EHR), and the overall healthcare delivery system.

These interactions, if implemented correctly, can lead to tremendous improvements in safety, efficiency, and defensibility of the care provided. On the other hand, incorrect or incomplete system configuration and/or use can lead to significant problems. Examples of success stories as well as situations in which improvements could have been made will also be reviewed during the session.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the interaction of both technical and non-technical elements of EHR use can improve patient safety and defensibility of care
  • Examine the unintended consequences associated with EHR configuration and use that can affect patient safety and defensibility of care
  • Identify common EHR-related issues that plague medical professional liability cases

David Casarett, MD, MA

Chief of Palliative Care, Professor of Medicine, Duke University/Duke Health

David Casarett, MD, MA

David Casarett, MD, MA, is a palliative care physician and health services researcher whose work focuses on improving systems of care for people with serious, life-threatening illnesses. A professor of medicine at Duke University, Dr. Casarett also serves as the chief of palliative care for Duke Health and the director of the Duke Center for Palliative Care. He is the founder of the VA PROMISE Center (now the Veteran Experience Center), which aims to improve end-of-life care for veterans, and also designed the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE) research project, which examined quality measures from EMRs and families’ perceptions of care at a dozen hospices across the U.S.

Dr. Casarett has spoken about medical marijuana at Yale and Stanford University and has also given a much-viewed TED Talk about how visiting a marijuana dispensary in California changed his perspective on healthcare. In 2006, he received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor given by the U.S. government to researchers in the early stages of their careers.

Dr. Casarett is also a published author whose work includes three non-fiction books and two novels, as well as articles in print and online in outlets such as The New York Times, Newsweek, Wired, Medscape, Discover, and Salon. His most recent book is Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana, which reviewers have called "readable, absorbing, and informative" (The New York Times), "entertaining" (Philadelphia Inquirer), and "a valuable introduction" (Washington Post).

Dr. Casarett will be presenting...

Medical Cannabis: The Truth Behind the Buzz

clock  11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. | Breakout Session

There’s a lot of discussion about marijuana legalization given that medical cannabis is now legal in more than half of U.S. states and a growing number have legalized recreational marijuana use by adults. But does medical cannabis work, or is it just an excuse to get high?

As other states grapple with the question of legalization, it’s important for physicians to be able to counsel patients about medical cannabis, including its risks as well as potential benefits. This session will address the key considerations for physicians to take into account amid this changing landscape.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • List the main effects of the most common cannabinoids
  • Describe the evidence base for medical cannabis
  • Identify strategies for counseling patients about the most common risks of cannabis

Michael Hanak, MD

Associate Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Rush University Medical Center

Michael Hanak, MD

Michael Hanak, MD, is associate chief medical informatics officer at Rush University Medical Center and vice chairperson of clinical programs in the Department of Family Medicine at Rush Medical College. As co-chair of the Quality Committee for the 650+ physician medical group, Dr. Hanak is well-versed in areas of clinical quality improvement, data analytics, and value-based care. He led Rush’s participation in the Pursuing Equity national collaborative sponsored by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and is a member of the Health Equity Workgroup of the Illinois Academy of Family Physicians.

Under Dr. Hanak’s leadership, Rush was a recipient of a $1.8 million Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services grant through the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative (TCPI), resulting in performance gains across multiple ambulatory clinical quality domains. Rush was later named a CDC Million Hearts award winner through Dr. Hanak’s efforts to improve hypertension control rates across the medical group.

In addition to his work in the health system, he serves as vice president of the Illinois Academy of Family Physicians and is vice chairperson of the American Academy of Family Physicians delegation to the AMA.

Dr. Hanak will be presenting...

Dig Deeper: Screening for Social Determinants

clock  11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. | Breakout Session

More attention is being given to the social determinants of health as healthcare organizations seek to achieve improved health outcomes at lower costs. Though risk management of medically complex patients is essential, attention must also be paid to factors that influence a person’s health and their ability to access care. This session reviews factors that contribute to disparities in health outcomes and outlines one approach to raising awareness, improving screening, and addressing the social needs of high-risk patients.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Identify what social determinants of health (SDoH) are, why they matter, and the risks of failing to address them
  • Recognize the role of risk assessment in achieving success in value-based care
  • Describe one organization’s approach to screening and addressing SDoH needs in an effort to better manage high-risk patients

Stephanie Martin, DO

Medical Director and Co-Owner, Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics

Michael Hanak, MD

Stephanie Martin, DO, is medical director and co-owner of Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics, LLC. Through her consulting business, she helps hospitals develop obstetric intensive care programs. In addition to her extensive clinical experience caring for critically ill patients, Dr. Martin has helped lead and develop maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) practices in several states. Her passion for educating has also led to her role as course director for America’s Board Review MFM Oral Board Exam Review Course, which helps MFM candidates prepare for the oral board examination.

She received her medical degree from the University of North Texas Health Science Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth. She completed her residency in OB-GYN at the University of California Irvine Medical Center, where she also completed a fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine. She is board certified in MFM and OB-GYN.

She recently completed her term on the board of directors for the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine and continues to serve as chairman of the membership and bylaws committee. Dr. Martin’s particular interests involve medical and surgical complications of pregnancy and critical care in obstetrics. She has authored multiple book chapters and articles, and she travels frequently to lecture on these topics.

Dr. Martin will be presenting...

Levels of Maternal Care in the United States: What Does This Mean for You?

clock  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. | Breakout Session

The United States has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in the developed world. Maternal morbidity is even more common and presents opportunities to address gaps in care and improve pregnancy outcomes. Recently, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Centers for Disease Control have proposed a framework for levels of maternal care in response to the rising rates of maternal morbidity and mortality.

A maternal level of care designation will require level III and IV centers to formally address care of the critically ill pregnant woman. Development of a program to care for critically ill pregnant women requires a multidisciplinary, systematic approach to program development that many facilities may not be prepared to undertake. In this session we will review the levels of maternal care designations, the problem with increasing maternal morbidity and mortality, and the key components of successful obstetric critical care program development.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize current issues with maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States
  • Define levels of maternal care
  • Describe key components of a critical care obstetrics (CCOB) program

Samuel Volchenboum, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Dean of Master’s Education, Associate Chief Research Informatics Officer, University of Chicago

Samuel Volchenboum, MD, PhD

Sam Volchenboum, MD, PhD, is co-founder and chief medical officer of Litmus Health and serves as the dean of master’s education for the Biological Sciences Division at the University of Chicago. Dr. Volchenboum also serves as the associate chief research informatics officer and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Volchenboum’s entire career has been dedicated to making medicine more data-driven to augment care, improve safety, and enhance physician and patient satisfaction.

Litmus, a real-world data platform for clinical research, combines his expertise in both clinical research and medical informatics. As a former director and now as a faculty advisor to the Center for Research Informatics at the University of Chicago, Dr. Volchenboum continues to guide an organization that manages one of the largest research-based clinical data warehouses in the country.

Dr. Volchenboum holds a master’s in informatics from MIT, an MD and PhD in molecular biology from the Mayo Clinic, and has spent almost 20 years as a practicing pediatric oncologist.

Dr. Volchenboum will be presenting...

Making Big Data Actionable for Physicians: How to Leverage Data for Better Patient Outcomes

clock  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. | Breakout Session

In this session, we’ll address one of the biggest trends in medicine and technology – big data. Physicians now have greater access to more information about their patients than ever before, but it can be overwhelming and unclear as to how to best leverage this information. Namely, how can physicians use data to create better outcomes for their patients?

Rather than focus on big ideas or abstract applications of big data, this discussion will focus on making big data practical for physicians by identifying relevant data streams and technologies to make leveraging big data simple. We’ll also review several examples of physicians using these technologies and data streams in their practice.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe both what big data mean in medicine, as well as the practical uses of data streams that inform insights about patient care
  • Identify the technologies available to physicians to make big data manageable
  • Illustrate how physicians are already leveraging big data to improve patient treatment and outcomes in daily practice

Shoshana Ungerleider, MD

Internist at Sutter Health and Founder of End Well

Shoshana Ungerleider, MD

Shoshana Ungerleider, MD, is a physician, founder, philanthropist and speaker. She works as an internist, practicing hospital medicine at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. She received her medical degree from Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, and completed residency at California Pacific Medical Center, where she is now on the teaching faculty and serves on the Executive Board of the Foundation Board of Trustees.

Dr. Ungerleider started the Ungerleider Palliative Care Education Fund to support innovative programs that further palliative care education at every level. The Ungerleider Fund initiated a comprehensive education program to enhance medical training around advanced illness and end-of-life care, physician communication and wellness for healthcare providers at Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center.

She funded Extremis, a short documentary about end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit by Academy Award-nominated director Dan Krauss. The film world premiered at Tribeca Film Festival in April 2016 and won Best Documentary Short. The film was nominated for a 2016 Academy Award and nominated for two Emmy Awards. She also executive produced End Game, a short documentary on hospice and palliative care by Academy Award-winning directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, which premiered at Sundance Film Festival this year and was acquired by Netflix. The film was nominated for a 2018 Academy Award.

She founded End Well, a first of its kind media platform and annual symposium on human-centered design and innovation to improve the end-of-life experience.

As a writer and speaker, Dr. Ungerleider has been featured as an expert on PBS NewsHour, CBS News, Fox News Radio as well as in Vox and STAT. She has spoken at Google, Exponential Medicine, The Schwartz Center’s Compassion in Action Healthcare Conference, The Coalition to Transform Advance Care Summit, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Columbia University, Chapman University, Sutter Health, Cambia Health and Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Ungerleider was named to the 2018 40 Under 40 class by the San Francisco Business Times, Becker’s Hospital Review "Rising stars: 90 Healthcare Leaders Under 40" and listed in Huffington Post’s 99 "Limit Breaking Female Founders." She was named 2018 Woman of the Year by Women Healthcare Executives of Northern California.

Dr. Ungerleider will be presenting...

An Rx for Burnout: How Can We Bring Joy and Meaning Back to Healthcare?

clock  2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. | Closing Keynote

The incidence of burnout, depression, substance abuse and suicide have placed the medical profession in a challenging and deeply misunderstood crisis. Data show that too many bureaucratic tasks, long work hours and increased computerization of practice are among the top causes of physician burnout.

In an era of complex billing requirements, cumbersome electronic health records and increasing demands for productivity, how do we create a culture that allows doctors to be both excellent humans and excellent clinicians? How do we reignite the curiosity and rekindle the compassion that compelled us to become physicians in the first place? This closing session will explore strategies to help reprioritize the many competing factors in healthcare – and begin to bring joy back to the practice of medicine.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the scope of the clinician burnout epidemic and recognize the multifaceted nature of the problem
  • Identify the relevant historical factors that have led to the current state of burnout in the U.S.
  • Summarize strategies to address the systems-level factors that can lead to burnout